If my test results show that I do not have the high risk APOE e4 genotype, does that mean that I won’t get late-onset Alzheimer’s?

People without the APOE e4 genotype can still develop Alzheimer's disease. APOE e4 is associated with a 3- to 15-fold increased risk of developing late-onset Alzheimer's disease compared to individuals without the APOE e4 genotype.

If my test results show that I do not have the high risk APOE e4 genotype, does that mean that I won’t get late-onset Alzheimer’s?2017-01-24T21:28:42+00:00

What are the possible results and what are the interpretations for each result type?

After genetic testing, there are six possible outcomes: e2/e2, e2/e3, e2/e4, e3/e3, e3/e4, e4/e4 APOE e2: The presence of an APOE e2 allele may provide some protection against Alzheimer’s disease. APOE e3: The APOE e3 allele is the most common allele and is a neutral allele, meaning there is no increased or decreased risk with [...]

What are the possible results and what are the interpretations for each result type?2017-01-24T21:28:43+00:00

How long will testing take?

Testing begins immediately once the samples arrive at the laboratory and is completed within 3 to 5 business days.

How long will testing take?2017-01-24T21:28:43+00:00

Can the APOE genotyping test diagnose Alzheimer’s in a symptomatic individual?

The APOE e4 allele is found in the majority of patients with Alzheimer's disease. An individual who has tested positive for the APOE e4 allele has a 3- to 15-fold increased risk of eventually developing late-onset Alzheimer's disease. However, since not all individuals who have the APOE e4 eventually develop the disease, the presence of [...]

Can the APOE genotyping test diagnose Alzheimer’s in a symptomatic individual?2017-01-24T21:28:43+00:00

What are my risks of developing Alzheimer’s if I have the APOE e4 high risk version of the gene?

Individuals who test positive for one copy of the APOE e4 allele have 3X increased risk of developing late-onset Alzheimer's disease compared to an individual who has tested negative for APOE e4. Individuals who test positive for two copies of the APOE e4 allele have a 10 - 15X increased risk of developing late-onset Alzheimer's disease [...]

What are my risks of developing Alzheimer’s if I have the APOE e4 high risk version of the gene?2017-01-24T21:28:43+00:00

What is the APOE gene?

The APOE gene encodes Apolipoprotein E (ApoE). ApoE is essential for packaging and carrying cholesterol and fats through the bloodstream. There are three common alleles of the APOE gene: APOE e2, APOE e3 and APOE e4. APOE e4 is the strongest known genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s, while APOE e3 is the most common allele, and APOE e2 appears [...]

What is the APOE gene?2017-01-24T21:28:43+00:00

What are the types of Alzheimer’s disease?

There are two general types of Alzheimer’s disease, which are basically similar in the effect and progression of the disease, apart from the difference in genetic causes and the age of onset.   The two different types of Alzheimer’s disease are Early-Onset Familial Alzheimer’s Disease and Late-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease.

What are the types of Alzheimer’s disease?2017-01-24T21:28:43+00:00

How common is Alzheimer’s?

The prevalence of dementia and, in particular, Alzheimer’s increases with age with an estimated 25 – 45% of persons over 85 years suffering from some form of dementia.

How common is Alzheimer’s?2017-01-24T21:28:44+00:00